Visible Memories now on YouTube

We have uploaded our film, Visible Memories, to YouTube for everyone to view. You can view this at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VK8K6aAEYTY&t=3s

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Visible Memories

a film about self injury

The issue of self-injury is surrounded by stigma and misunderstanding. Such behaviour is often labelled as attention seeking or, mistakenly, as attempted suicide. When they come into contact with traditional health and social care agencies, people who self-injure often feel the treatment they receive exacerbates rather than relieves the situation.

Visible Memories allows people who self-injure to describe their experiences. They tell us some of the reasons why they self-injure and what approaches they find helpful or unhelpful. The film shows examples of statutory and voluntary agencies where there is good practice. Setting self-injury in a more general context of self-harm, the film argues that such behaviour is a valid coping mechanism for dealing with internal emotional distress, and that consequently, the challenge for those who do not self-injure is to come to terms with their own feelings in relating to those who do.

The film is also available for purchase on DVD at £5 per DVD.

If you would like to purchase please make a donation through our website – https://www.mindincroydon.org.uk/fundraising/donate/ – and email the receipt to admin@mindincroydon.org.uk with the name and address you would like it posted to.

Unspoken now on YouTube

We have uploaded our film, Unspoken, to YouTube for everyone to view. You can view this at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCct-6vGMx_I6RbYsgOh4rpA

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Unspoken

a film about sex, relationships and mental health

The sexuality of people with mental health problems raises important clinical, social and legal concerns. Despite this, there is relatively little written about the subject and staff can feel confused and embarrassed when discussing these issues.

Mental health problems may interfere with peoples’ sexual function. For example, depression is typically associated with decreased sexual interest, libido and sexual performance, whereas mania is associated with disinhibition, sexual inappropriateness and heightened sexuality.

Practitioners are aware that psychiatric medication can interfere with sexual function, yet service users sometimes feel that these matters are ignored or discounted.

Sometimes, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users feel poorly treated by services.

This is perhaps not surprising, given that for many years psychiatry considered homosexuality to be a mental disorder.

Unspoken explores these issues, with service users explaining their experiences. A range of other experts discuss how professionals might respond differently, and models of good practice are presented.

At a time when there is such an emphasis on promoting equality, working towards recovery and overcoming stigma, the film argues the importance of discussing matters openly, challenging poor practice and recognising and celebrating progress.

The film is also available for purchase on DVD at £5 per DVD.

If you would like to purchase please make a donation through our website – https://www.mindincroydon.org.uk/fundraising/donate/ – and email the receipt to admin@mindincroydon.org.uk with the name and address you would like it posted to.

Hard to Believe now on YouTube

We have uploaded our film, Hard to Believe, to YouTube for everyone to view. You can view this on our YouTube Channel.

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Hard to Believe

a film about mental health and spirituality

Spirituality is an area that mental health services may have overlooked in the past. Staff can feel out of their depth in this area – some see such beliefs as being harmful to people, others may interpret these beliefs as symptoms of mental ill health. Equally, some people from Faith communities lack knowledge and understanding of mental health issues, even though there is evidence that spiritual well-being is an integral part of good mental health.

Hard to Believe tells the story of three service users, how their Spirituality was perceived by mental health services, and the role that Spirituality has played as part of their recovery.

The film considers the work of the Chaplaincy at the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust, the Croydon branch of APCMH and Nigel Copsey’s Multi-Faith Team in East London. Dr Andrew Powell, Founder Chair of
the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ Spirituality Special Interest Group, also features.

Hard to Believe explores models of good practice in terms of how mental health services can work better to meet peoples’ spiritual needs and also how faith communities can develop a better understanding of mental health problems and thus support people in their community who may be experiencing such difficulties.

The film is also available for purchase on DVD at £5 per DVD.

If you would like to purchase please make a donation through our website – http://www.mindincroydon.org.uk/donations.asp – and email the receipt to admin@mindincroydon.org.uk with the name and address you would like it posted to.